Commitment has the potential to break shackles of deprivation; it can win euphoria for you, persuades you to believe that ultimately relentless effort is the real triumphant. It’s your persistent hard work which is important to win a chase, rather your residing atmosphere. This unflinching conviction made it possible for the brave girl of Chakwal, a girl living in slum, to win first position in SSC examination. 

Her mammoth achievement pinched attention of CM Punjab, who granted her a house for his extra ordinary performance. It’s encouraging that CM Punjab applauded her; such appraisals ought to be highlighted. He provided her scholarship and promised his full support for her future education.

Government ought to reject myopic policies, and look after basic educational necessities.
Government ought to reject myopic policies, and look after basic educational necessities.

But despite these encouraging stories, we need to understand why these aspirants have to strive so much for their basic right? From now, she may get a soothing environment to study, but hitherto she would have faced colossal problems to continue her education. She could have evaded the hard days of her education if she was being provided with basic education facilities, but then she would not be a part of news. The core problem lies in the fact that symbolism is dominating altruism. Our government provides incentives to all those who achieve something after trampling exuberance of their childhood to achieve something, but I wonder when will I get a point to praise our government for their steps for primary education?  Every student has to endeavor to make his/her academics exceptional, but when you are living in a shoddy home, struggling to manage fiscal problems of your education then this hard work transforms itself into agony. This struggle depletes optimism, and most of the aspirants become exhaustive enough to elucidate education from their lives, leaving behind some exceptional cases, like the girl from Chakwal. 

Our government is ready to subsidize students when they achieve something after 10 years of education, but shows apathetic attitude towards those who are struggling to enroll themselves in schools. Alif Ailaan, an accomplished educational organization, concludes that 48% schools are without basic amenities, which include toilet, electricity, drinking water and boundary walls−a gloomy picture.

Read:Human development and social evolution−the snubbed issues of Pakistan

If we will just extract exuberance from such events and snub state’s dismal education situation, then we are indirectly maligning millions of aspirants searching for opportunities to enter school. Government ought to reject myopic policies, and look after basic needs of populace, so that we may find these small hands holding pencils, shaping their future, rather waiting for a decade to get further opportunities.

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