Soon it will be possible for smartphone users to be able to use their most popular Android apps on Windows.That’s what many users have long been hoping for, but Microsoft did not feel it was necessary to get active quickly here.A remedy could soon be provided by an external provider of development tools.

Android Apps On Windows

A corresponding tool has now been announced by the company MechDome. It has long been selling tools that developers can use to easily port Android applications to iOS. Now another product is to follow, making Android software quite easily convert into UWP applications for Microsoft’s Windows platform. 

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The applications would be equally usable on Windows 10 and Windows 10 Mobile. To clarify the functionality, MechDome backed up the corresponding announcement tweet with a screenshot showing various Android apps running in separate windows under Windows. However, the company is still a bit covered, as the result of the upcoming tool should look concrete. Basically, there are two possibilities here: Either the developers have to port the respective application, whereby then a second version would have to be provided and maintained. The other option is to run native Android apps on a UWP layer, which then translates to the Windows substructure.

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MechDome has also said nothing about a possible release date yet. “It’s under development, and we’ll be releasing regular updates on our progress,” the company said. Even Microsoft itself had once planned Android support for Windows 10 Mobile. The Astoria project in question never got past some very early previews and about two years ago the final end was announced.

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4 COMMENTS

  1. […] First and foremost, the data collected by Google on the configuration of the active Android systems at the end of the month shows that it will take a very long time for Android users to be provided with reasonably current operating system versions in relevant quantities. And while at least the extremely aged versions of “Gingerbread” from the end of 2010 and “Ice Cream Sandwich” from the end of 2011 are slowly but surely disappearing, still significant user groups are still stuck on systems that are about five years old. In particular, KitKat still has a share of 12 percent. Also Read: You Might Be Able To Use Android Apps On Windows Soon […]

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